Nuts, snails, oranges, moss, and leaves

December 04, 2009 By: erik Category: Colindres, Damn, Nature!, Photos 174 views

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Autumn BenzLast week, when I took my walk around town with my video camera, which resulted in some moving photographs, and a photo of a local fruitful business, I also took some other still photos that I like a lot. So here’s a little medley of these photos.

Autumn Benz
I noticed this leaf nestled snugly under this hood ornament. The symbolic, reflective, natural, and seasonal aspects made for a great photograph. And then right as I was focusing, the leaf blew away. So I picked it, or one of the hundreds like it, off the ground and posed it as it had been. But it blew away again. After about six tries, I finally got this photograph which is blurrier than I’d like due to my having to remove my hand holding the leaf so quickly. Oh well. I call it “Autumn Benz”.

Winter Orange Tree
For some reason the citrus fruit trees around town really don’t like to let go of their fruit. The result is some enormous lemons and oranges that I’m pretty sure are a couple years old. Another curious consequence is the sight of a tree in the winter, devoid of leaves, but full of fruit. Behind the tree is the apartment building they are finally completing next to ours. We’ve had cranes obscuring our view for over two years now!

Nut Among Moss
I always enjoy examining the right-at-eye-level moss atop this wall, and that day I found some freckled nuts that had fallen from the tree above.

Nut Among Moss
Some people are nuts about moss.

Snail Shell
Some of the snails around town are simply gorgeous. Both visually and mathematically.

 
  • Andrés

    My dear friend Erik:

    You are wrong; these fruits of the picture are not oranges or lemons. In Spain, this fruit is called “caqui” (Diospyros kaki). Remember I am grocer!!!

    Regards!

    • Damn. Thanks for that, Andrés. Now my title is wrong! 🙁

      But we do have some lemon trees around Colindres that keep their lemons for more than a year.

  • Italians have kaki too. My wife’s father grows them. They’re called “persimmon” in English.