Town Gazebo

March 02, 2007 By: erik Category: Colindres, Photos 1,136 views

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I had to take some books back to the library the other day. The library in Colindres is the worst I’ve ever seen. There’s no order in the books, and there are only about 200 books in a cramped little room. It’s pretty sad. I took my camera along and snapped some pictures of the town hall and a little gazebo thing.
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I think it’s cool how they can grow trees together like this. That’s the Colindres Town Hall (“Ayuntamiento” in Spanish).

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Structures like this in the middle of town squares are pretty common in Spain. They can be used as stages for gatherings. The most common use is for a band to play up there.

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This door really intrigued me. What could possibly be under there?

I noticed that the tiles are painted representing scenes from a story. You don’t have to live in Spain too long to know that there’s only one Spanish folk story. Sure enough, I walked around to the other side and saw the windmill scene, the only scene anyone really knows about the story.

 
  • JAV

    Hello!

    I have read your blog since the beginning and despite I would have post some comments the need of create an account stopped me.
    I think I have an answer to one of your questions so… here I am.
    Town band used to play on the “kiosko” and they store their musical instruments inside of it.
    That’s what I remember, but I am too young for having seen it, maybe I’m wrong.
    Books are one of my passions so I share your opinion about the library.
    It is really well managed with its tiny budget, I’d like that some of the large amounts of money for sports will be used for moving the library to the XXI century.
    Last time I visited it had 2 rooms with books, but the second one is quite small.

    Sorry for my bad english, I’m not used to write it. 🙂

    See you

  • Gracias Jose! Great comment!

    I have read your blog since the beginning and despite I would have post some comments the need of create an account stopped me.

    I’m glad you’ve signed up. That requirement is there to prevent the kind of online behavior that internet anonymity provides. I’m sure you understand. You’ve only signed up with a little mysql database running on a server that I control, so there’s no risk.

    Town band used to play on the “kiosko” and they store their musical instruments inside of it.
    That’s what I remember, but I am too young for having seen it, maybe I’m wrong.

    Interesting. As I understand it, most musical instruments don’t handle extreme temperatures too well. I wonder how much the temperature fluctuates under there. That door seems awfully small to fit a drum kit or an upright bass into. I’m disappointed that the tradition has mostly ceased.

    On a side note, I think it’s funny that Spanish would adopt a word like “kiosko” (from the Germans?). The Spanish language has no use for the letter “k” aside from adopted foreign words. They could have spelled it “quiosco”, and it would be pronounced the same.

    I’d like that some of the large amounts of money for sports will be used for moving the library to the XXI century.

    Too true. Unfortunately sports generates revenue in an obvious and short-term way, where books do not.

    For the rest of you, Jose is a guy my age that I met online last year. He grew up in and around Colindres.

    Jose, I hope you will speak up in the future when I make other “the Spanish are strange! why would they do ____?” comments.

    Sorry for my bad english, I’m not used to write it.

    Your English was perfect until you started apologizing. 🙂 It should be, “I’m not used to writing it”.

    I wish everyone would comment more. See how this somewhat-boring post got improved by Jose’s comment?

  • JAV

    You are right. After checking the word “kiosko” I see it doesn’t exists in spanish language. You can use “kiosco” or “quiosco”.
    As usual, non native speakers pay more attention to details, after all it is not a daily use word for me. 🙂
    I use the online “official” dictionary to solve this questions: http://www.rae2.es followed by the word you want to search.
    example: http://www.rae2.es/quiosco

    I was thinking about the kind of bands that go parade on holidays with some wind instruments but as you point the drums diameter surely was given by the door height. Another example of oppression, in this case from the bricklayer lobby.
    Maybe there’s a ratio between drums size and residents ear tolerance. Who knows? Ancient wisdom now forgotten.

    Happy to hear from you.

  • Paul

    Yes, I do see. Good to hear from you Jose!

    It looks to me like large drums and tubas could actually fit through that storage door.