Little Things

May 13, 2008 By: erik Category: Geeky, Photos, Photoshop, Travel 548 views

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My tilt-shifting habit apparently knows no end. I’m starting to look at all photos with a “What would this look like in miniature?” attitude. Two of these photos are ones I took in Dublin last weekend. Another one is a very unique medieval castle in Slovenia. And the final photo was taken by my friend, Hubbers, in Tuscany last weekend (his excuse for not joining me for a Guinness in Dublin). I’m starting to notice that the better the initial photo, the better the tilt-shifted version turns out.
Christmas in May (miniature)

Miniature Christmas in May.

River Liffey Reflection

Reflection on River Liffey. By choosing which part of the photo to put in focus, I can directly control the eye of the viewer. Hard not to look at that water, isn’t it?

Predjamski grad (miniature)

Predjama Castle is built into a cave.

Miniature Cathedral of Pisa

Piazza dei Miracoli in Pisa, Tuscany, Italy. This is the first tilt-shift I’ve done without using a linear focus line. I’m pleased with the result.

The last one is my favorite. Apparently the tower almost fell over, but Hubbers was there to hold it up. Clichés are fun.

 
  • The first one makes my brain hurt. “Shouldn’t the in-focus area”, it wonders, “be all of the field of view that is near the focal distance of the lens?” As a result, my gaze is frightened back to the in-focus area and cowers there, unwilling to confront the discomforting prospect of a depth of field determined by a perspective other than that of the relevant lens.

    Like that one time I thought real hard about what the fifth dimension looks like and then woke up on the sidewalk with a nosebleed.

    No, but seriously though. I almost never try to simulate depth of field because of this sensation. I may be over-sensitive to it. I do, however, sometimes subtly blur a low-contrast region where I’m pretty sure people won’t be looking anyway. Your third image down kind of does that, and I think it’s my favorite of the group (though the nearby wall in the lower right being as in-focus as the distant castle makes my gaze nervously tug on its earlobe).

    I like where you’re going with this stuff, by the way. I’ve run across tutorials on variations on the simulated tilt-shift technique a few times, but never really saw any photos that made me think I should take the time to try it until seeing it here.

    The fifth dimension, by the way, looks like this.

  • “ShouldnÂ’t the in-focus area”, it wonders, “be all of the field of view that is near the focal distance of the lens?”

    Yes. And I broke that cardinal rule on that image. But something about making the Santa and all the bricks at its height in focus got the better of me.

    (though the nearby wall in the lower right being as in-focus as the distant castle makes my gaze nervously tug on its earlobe)

    Again, you’ve spotted the major flaw. I put less energy into that one than I should have. For the last one, I did spend conscious effort selecting only the front tower for focus. I am still very much an amateur at this and hope to improve my technique in the future. I hope to one day create an image that does not give you a spontaneous cranial hemorrhage.

    If you’ve somehow conquered picturing the fourth dimension and moved on to the fifth, then I’m convinced that you are some kind of god. I dearly wish that your link to the fifth dimension wasn’t broken, but perhaps it’s better that way.

    Thank you for your detailed and critical commentary. As you know, I endeavor to do the same on your blog.

  • Zounds, but the link works for me! Many thanks.