A Night on Burkemont Mountain

December 01, 2008 By: erik Category: Photos, Travel, USA 974 views

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Phil's CabinMarga and I spent the night of Sunday, November 23rd, 2008, in a cabin on the top of Burkemont Mountain. The wind whipped, whistled and rattled. When we woke up at dawn, it was cold and drizzly outside. After a couple hours of coffee and sitting by the fire, I suggested we go for a walk, but I was unable to pull Marga from the toasty hearth, so I ventured out alone with my camera. Below are the photos I took.
Ladybug Visitor

There were 5 or 6 ladybugs buzzing around the cabin before I left. This is the best photo I got of one.

Walker Top Cemetery

Walker Top Cemetery and Walker Top Church are the first stop on any walk from Phil’s Cabin. According to this report submitted to a genealogy website, there are 25–50 gravestones in the cemetery, mostly from the Walker family.

Black Fence

A black chain link fence around the cemetery.

Lichen Grave

Gravestone lichen.

Moss and Lichen and a gravestone

Lichen rocks, moss rules, and death is forever.

US Geological Survey Benchmark – Burkemont Mountain

I love these US Geological Survey Benchmarks. Oddly, the last digit of the elevation measurement has been destroyed somehow. It claims an elevation of 2,35? feet. It was more or less on the very top of Burkemont Mountain, which is listed as a peak elevation of 2,559 feet (780 meters), but I sure didn’t see a place 200 feet higher anywhere.

Walker Top Church

The church is leveled by piled stones.

Propery Boundary

Property Boundary: State Park land behind this sign.

Burkemont Fire Tower

The Burkemont mountain fire tower. We climbed up there when we visited a few years ago, but with the wind whipping as it was and being alone, I didn’t chance it.

Burkemont Fire Tower

Looking up from inside the base of the tower.

Corona on Fire Tower

Someone had left a bottle of beer on the bottom rung.

Overrun old house

This house is a little overrun by Nature.

Outhouse

A very stereotypical outhouse.

Phil's Cabin

Phil’s cabin. It started out as a small shack, and Phil has built the rest on his own. The entire top floor is a single large bedroom. Very nice.

Phil's Cabin

From another angle.

All of these photos are accurately geotagged to within a couple meters, so feel free to click on them and view them on a map on Flickr.

Thanks again to Phil for letting us hang out in his cabin. Late Monday morning, we realized that we hadn’t brought any food, so we had to abandon our mountain perch and head into town for some sustenance.

 
  • I am with you on the coolness of Geological Survey benchmarks. One Christmas a cousin of mine who was involved with a USGS project in Antarctica gave my grandmother the BEST PAPERWEIGHT EVER: a genuine South Pole benchmark.

  • That’s a pretty impressive cabin. And thanks to flickr geotagging I now know EXACTLY where he lives.
    Maybe I’ll pay him a little visit myself some day.

  • Two things:

    1. You know I am in love with the whole marker thing and am now also horribly jealous of sgazzetti’s grandmother.

    2. I recently read a fascinating anecdote about lichen and gravestones.